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Inside.com launches 14th newsletter

19 January, by Jason Calacanis[ —]

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Inside.com has launched its 14th newsletter: inside.com/facebook. Our mission is “to make you smarter & better at your job.”

We write every single newsletter with this in mind, and we’ve perfected a format that is wildly addicting to our readers. We read hundreds of stories in a vertical, and we summarize the top 12 of them perfectly so that you can quickly get up to speed.

We respect our readers and don’t try to trick them into clicking on links to get more page views. In fact, we only want one page from you ever, and that’s on the signup form for the topic you care most about.

https://inside.com/ev (electric vehicles, autonomous driving, etc.)
https://inside.com/streaming <– netflix, amazon, etc,
https://inside.com/technically-sentient <— AI, Machine Learning
https://inside.com/readthisthing <— one great long read a day
Some upcoming newsletters you can vote on:

 


Donald Trump

12 January, by Austin Smith[ —]

From the Inside team:

TL;DR: We just launched Inside Trump, and we think you should check it out.

We’ve been busy at Inside over the past year building a network of email newsletters. We’ve added a dozen newsletters and 10xed our audience since March of last year, and have nailed down an editorial model that delivers huge value to our fast-growing readership.

Our team has become masterful at deeply understanding a topic, tracking down the most important people, companies, and developments, consuming every bit of news and information around it, and delivering a must-read roundup inspired by the famous presidential daily briefings. Given that coverage of Trump is absolutely ubiquitous, we knew we had a challenging undertaking with Inside Trump, but we set out build it.

After much back-and-forth with our most loyal readers, and many Google Doc iterations of what this newsletter might be, we think we’ve got something that really does add value to the discussion.

Inside Trump is partly curation — we’re finding the best coverage across hundreds of publications and providing the high-level details along with links to great reporting so you can dive deeper. It’s also partly synthesis — after reading as much news as possible, the newsletter is relaying a concise, clickbait-free roundup of the news you need to know. Finally, it’s also partly original content from deep dives into Trump’s appointments and policies to explorations of the actions he takes in his first 100 days.

Inside Trump has no political agenda. We’re just here to relay the most important news and information to our readers.

If you want to stay up on this ever-fascinating topic, we hope you’ll subscribe to Inside Trump (also, we hope you’ll hit reply to our newsletters and let us know what you think.)

Here’s how you can get involved:

Subscribe to Inside Trump 

Join the discussion about Inside Trump on Product Hunt 

Click to tweet about Inside Trump 



LAUNCH Incubator is looking for a Program Director

http://www.addtoany.com/add_to/email?linkurl=http%3A%2F%2Fcalacanis.com%2F2017%2F01%2F04%2Flaunch-incubator-is-looking-for-a-full-time-program-director%2F&linkname=LAUNCH%20Incubator%20is%20looking%20for%20a%20Program%20Directorplay episode download
4 January, by Jason Calacanis[ —]
Program Director, LAUNCH Incubator

LAUNCH is looking for a driven and resourceful leader to develop content, curriculum and events for founders in the LAUNCH Incubator, as well as for our alumni and potential investments.

The ideal candidate is resourceful and a great communicator, who can listen to our founders, determine what speakers, skills and content would be most helpful to them in building their businesses, and quickly build content for them.

Responsibilities
  • Develop content for the LAUNCH Incubator, LAUNCH Festival, LAUNCH SCALE, Angel Summit and This Week in Startups that helps founders grow.
  • Manage mentors & speakers for 18 sessions of the LAUNCH Incubator. (Each session has five mentors, so this would be 90 mentors per year.)
  • Understand Lean Startup methodology to optimize your efforts.
  • Build and maintain relationships with our network of influencers.
  • Identify key topics, events, and issues for influencers to offer input on.
  • Communicate actively with our team & alumni, including reporting directly to our CEO/founder.
  • Help in selecting our incubator startups.
Qualifications
  • Five years working in and around startups.
  • Proven track record of building quality products, content and/or events.
  • An extensive network of startup people and a deep grasp of the ‘who’s who’ in areas like growth, sales/bd, saas, hr/ops, engineering, design, etc.
  • Intelligence & the ability to quickly build efficient, repeatable processes for scaling our organization.
  • Technical skills, with the ability to quickly add new ones.
  • Excellent communications and presentation skills.
Qualities
  • Hustle. You need to be able to track down busy, influential people and get them to come to our events. This requires creative communication, research, persistence, and hustle.
  • Persistence. We mentioned this above, but it bears reiteration. You might need to email someone six times before you catch their attention. We need someone willing to push hard.
  • Communication. This position requires exceptional writing ability for private (email, mailing lists) and public (social media, blog posts) communications.
  • Curiosity. To excel in this role, you need to be able to build a deep understanding of each of the verticals we publish in. That means knowing the events, companies, products, and most importantly, people, in each of these verticals and having your finger on the pulse of any changes or developments.
  • Time-management & Organization. We have thousands of founders apply for our incubator, and tens of thousands come to our events. We have to manage a deluge of interest that results in a finite amount of deep engagement. This requires organization and time management skills.

This is a full-time position, splitting time between Burlingame and San Francisco.

Compensation: $80-100k/year, plus equity

Apply: https://launchevents.typeform.com/to/WpdStG


Inside.com is looking for a Community and content development manager

3 January, by Jason Calacanis[ —]

Cool gig at Inside.com….

Inside.com is a network of email newsletters. We publish high quality roundups that curate, summarize, and analyze all of the most important news in many different verticals and industries. Some examples are cybersecurity, electric vehicles, virtual and augmented reality, artificial intelligence, drones, and more.
Over the past 10 months, we doubled our entire subscriber-base. Then we doubled it again. Then we doubled it a third time. And we’re just getting started. We also track net promoter scores and all of our newsletters score between 66 and 89 – which is right on par with world-renowned products like the iPhone and the Tesla Model S.
Our editorial team is masterful when it comes to creating a “presidential briefing” style update in any of these areas, but we also want to bring in voices of industry leaders to level up the content of the newsletters. This program is loosely modeled off the LinkedIn Influencer program, which you can read more about here.
We’re looking for someone to help create and grow this influencer program. The role consists of a few things:
  • Developing lists of the most influential people in all of our current and upcoming verticals
  • Identifying the best ways to contact and build relationships with these people
  • Applying a Lean Startup methodology to your outreach efforts
  • Building and maintaining relationships with our network of influencers
  • Identifying key topics, events, and issues for influencers to offer input on
  • Communicating actively with our editorial team to get this influencer content into our newsletters
Here are some key requirements:
  • Hustle. You need to be able to track down busy, influential people and get them to talk to you. This requires creative communication, research, persistence, and hustle.
  • Persistence. We mentioned this above, but it bears reiteration. You might need to email someone 6 times before you catch their attention. We need someone willing to push hard.
  • Communication. This is a growth position, not an editorial position, but we are an editorial-driven company and everybody needs to be able to write and communicate well.
  • Curiosity. To excel in this role, you need to be able to build a deep understanding of each of the verticals we publish in. That means knowing the events, companies, products, and most importantly, people, in each of these verticals and having your finger to the pulse of any changes or developments.

apply here


Heading to CES 2017; looking for interviews

3 January, by Jason Calacanis[ —]

Going to CES Wednesday until Sunday, currently attending the Core Dinner (Wednesday), DFJ dinner (Friday) and taping three episodes of This Week in Startups at James Siminoff’s Ring booth (GREAT product btw, I have two). Staying with my boy Tony Hsieh in his trailer park in an Airstream.

Have two of three interviews for TWIST locked up… need one more remarkable CEO/founder in the gadget/hardware/tech space…. cc: Jacqui Deegan, my producer (jacqui@launch.co).

Might do a quick hit for CNBC while there, have time for 1-2 other interviews if folks need a talking head.

The main goal: don’t get the CES flu.

Who else is going / what are your goals? <– click here for Facebook discussion about CES.


Inside Streaming

December 2016, by Austin Smith[ —]
We recently re-launched Inside.com with a new design that shows users our existing network of email newsletters, and also uses a Kickstarter-inspired model to let the audience decide which newsletter we launch next. Here’s what it looks like:

 

Today, we’re excited to be launching Inside Streaming, as it has been the most popular list on the site, having recently reached its subscriber goal.

Here’s a bit more about the newsletter:

We’ve all been there. You’ve got a few hours to kill before bed and just want to start binging a great new show, but every app and platform and channel has added 18 new things since the last time you checked. And how are you supposed to know a “Bosch” from a “Goliath” without wasting valuable time watching something that might stink?

Enter Inside Streaming, a weekly email keeping you up-to-date on everything great that’s streaming now or coming soon on Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, HBO, YouTube, Go90, Seeso, Fullscreen and beyond. Plus we’ve got news on up-and-coming services, shows and movies to look out for on the horizon and lots more about the business and lifestyle of cutting the cord.

So stop scanning and start watching more great shows you love by subscribing to Inside Streaming. We send updates every Friday, but occasional bonus surprise updates just for fun.


Here’s what you can do to get involved:

  • Subscribe!
  • Email the link (inside.com/streaming) to three friends, and CC team@inside on the emails so we know you’re helping out
  • Find Inside Streaming on Product Hunt and show your support ⬆️
  • Use this Click-to-tweet link to share the news
  • Let us know what you think!


Introducing Inside Amazon

November 2016, by Jason Calacanis[ —]

The Inside.com network of newsletters continues to grow. Today we’re launching our eleventh newsletter: Inside Amazon.

It’s an in-depth, twice-weekly look at everything happening at The Everything Store. Our team is tapped into the analysts, journalists, bloggers, insiders, and experts surrounding Amazon’s various lines of business — and bringing you all the most important news in a quick and easy read.

If you own $AMZN stock, sell products on the Amazon platform, build software on AWS, or simply have an Amazon Prime membership, we think you’ll find Inside Amazon really interesting.

Four quick asks:

  1. Head over to Product Hunt and look for Inside Amazon and join the discussion
  2. Subscribe: inside.com/amazon
  3. Send this post to a friend who’s interested in Amazon!
  4. Click to tweet a one-click subscribe card for Inside Amazon (can edit before sending)

As always, post a comment and let us know what you think.


Trump, Jobs  Tech

November 2016, by Jason Calacanis[ —]

As some of you know, I’ve tried to stay out of politics my whole life, instead focusing on creating and funding startups — which in turn create jobs.

My core belief is that if people have great jobs, you’re going to have a great society. That’s why so many elections seem to revolve, predictably, around the issue of employment.

This election was about jobs, specifically the blue collar ones.

The consensus view, from everything we’re reading, about what happened on November 8th is:

  1. Trump won because non-college educated, white voters who feel disenfranchised came out in greater numbers than anyone anticipated, while Hillary didn’t draw out as many voters as Obama did. [1] [2] [Chart 3]
  2. Many voted for Trump, despite some obvious and significant concerns, because they wanted a profound change in Washington.
  3. Polling was significantly off, causing false confidence for the Democrats.

This leads to a lot of questions:

  1. Why didn’t Hillary inspire more voters to come out? Have things gotten that much worse for middle America under Obama, or was it just Hillary (i.e., her “unlikable” tag)?
  2. Why did women vote against Hillary in such large numbers, even after Trump’s comments about women?
  3. Is this a one-time surge of the dwindling majority? How many more elections can this base, commonly referred to as “angry white men,” be sustained?
  4. Is this outcome about race, gender, personality or jobs?
  5. What is the future of the political parties if the GOP got elected by winning the Democratic base of blue-collar workers?
  6. Can anyone be president now? Is political experience still a requirement for the top job in the land, or is Trump a one-time Black Swan event where a person who didn’t serve in the military or hold political office somehow got the top job?

At its core this election is about jobs.

We believe we have an unemployment rate of four or five percent, but our system of reporting unemployment is inherently, and intentionally, skewed. [4] We don’t count people who have given up finding work, and those are the people — and families — I believe won the election for Trump.

If we want to bridge the gap between the “two Americas” I have a simple suggestion: we start telling the truth about employment.

In talking to the smartest kids in the class, I’ve learned that the true measure of how we are doing with jobs is simply calculated:

  1. What percentage of American adults have a job (the participation rate) [5]
  2. What they are getting paid (relative wages)

You can argue about what that money buys (#2), or if people are living in new ways that offer less employment and more leisure time (#1), and most of all you can study why the people who are no longer participating have opted out (aging out plays a big role).

At the end of the day we need to talk about real numbers — not politically motivated massaged ones.

We need a plan to increase wages and create jobs, that’s obvious, but we need to set the goal posts and have a politically neutral conversation about what “winning” looks like for Americans and America.

Adding to the political fun with numbers I’ve mentioned above, we now have two very important questions to answer:

  1. What does “acceptable employment” in the 21st century look like? (more below)
  2. Will the number of jobs rapidly go away due to massive advances in robotics and AI?

Here in Silicon Valley we have been really thinking about this because, candidly, we know we are starting to have an impact.

On “acceptable employment,” consider a former retail worker who loses or leaves their job and decides to contruct a life in which they Airbnb their home a couple of days a month and work two days a week for DoorDash. Doing so cuts their income by 20% but they double their leisure time, reduce their stress by 50% and are 100% happier — is that failure or success?

How do we report this person in our labour stats? According to our reporting today, they would be a failure, but the truth is they might have a much better life.

Adding to the confusion, the leisure time example above might be considered successful or a failure by the same person in the same lifetime. Heck, they might flip back and forth between full-time employment and a “lifestyle employment” every couple of years.

We are going through a reset of the 40-hour work week.

I’m guessing you’ve run into, or know, a ridesharing driver who says they drive into a major city from 60+ miles outside of the city two days a week, doing the arbitrage of 1/4th the living costs with XX%+ of hourly wages. Is this person a success or failure for figuring out how to pay <$1,000 a month for 3x the living space as someone paying $4,000 a month in the city?

How do we account for that individual in our stats? Are they happy and productive, or unhappy?

Will self-driving cars make living 60–90 miles outside of a city and commuting possible because you can work/sleep/netflix in a car going 90 MPH in no traffic? Does that solve a lot of problems around cost of living?

How do we account for that?

Candidly, we must remember that as Americans, we’ve already won when compared to the global scale — but past performance might not be indicative of future success. [6]

Things are moving quickly and it’s confusing for everyone. 2016 is a wake-up call, but it’s our game to lose. We are still the greatest country in the world, and with continued innovation, candidness and empathy we can lead humanity through this seismic shift in employment.

Best @jason

Further reading:

[ 1 ] https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/11/how-trump-won/507053/

[ 2 ] http://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/trump-us-politics-poor-whites/

[ 3 ] https://twitter.com/yanagiz/status/796382521688727552

[ 4 ] http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/what-is-the-real-unemployment-rate/

[ 5 ] https://twitter.com/Jason/status/796797519980204032

[ 6 ] http://hdr.undp.org/en/composite/HDI

[ 7 ] https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/trump-was-stronger-where-the-economy-is-weaker/

PS — Looking forward to seeing you all at launchscale.net next week. 50+ talks about how to grow your startup, plus 50 investors are hosting “founder speed dating.”

PPS — Set the date, LAUNCH Festival 2017 is on April 5th-7th!

PPPS — My startup Inside.com is up to 11 live newsletters. You should really check out the latest, Technically Sentient, about AI, as well as sign up for Inside Streaming which is starting next month and will help you select which show to binge watch next.


Technically Sentient

October 2016, by Jason Calacanis[ —]

screen-shot-2016-10-10-at-11-34-37-pm

I’m excited to announce another fantastic newsletter today: Technically Sentient. It’s all about artificial intelligence, robotics, and neurotechnology.

This one is special, because it’s not starting from scratch like our other newsletters have. Rob May has been doing a fantastic job writing it over the past couple of years, and now he’s bringing his expertise to Inside to reach our smart, sophisticated audience.

If you think this is interesting, here are a couple of things you can do:

  1. Head over to Product Hunt and look for Technically Sentient, and leave a comment (I’m doing a Q&A right now)
  2. Subscribe: Inside.com/technically-sentient
  3. Forward to a friend who cares about AI.

Artificial intelligence is one of the most important areas of technology emerging today, and Rob really has his finger to the pulse of it. If you care about AI, this newsletter is simply a must-read.

As always, leave a comment and let us know what you think. — @jason


Email newsletters might save journalism — here’s why

September 2016, by Jason Calacanis[ —]

[ Tl;dr: Today we’re launching the new Inside.com – a network of high-quality email newsletters. We have eight live newsletters, and we’re launching an exciting system that allows intelligent readers like yourself to decide which newsletter we launch next. Thanks to Rocketship for building the new platform. ]

voting

When I started Inside as an app, our idea was that if we could do an exceptional job curating the news, then millions of people would download our product and use it daily.

We learned that, while a dedicated base of fans couldn’t get enough of it, most folks didn’t have space for another app in their lives. This is a lesson that has been hard-learned by a whole crop of “news-reader” style apps – from tiny startups like Circa to mega-brands like Facebook, both of which folded their news apps.

The facts are simple: people are adding an average of ZERO new apps to their phones each month, and most modern news consumption happens in social media) places like Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Reddit, and, of course, email).

Meanwhile, publishers increasingly rely on viral traffic – which incentivizes silly clickbait, or worse they focus on writing headlines that rank in Google (best iPhone cases FTW!).

Email incentivizes the opposite — it drives us to build a lasting relationship with our readers who demand we deliver massive value. If we don’t they click unsubscribe.

I love that newsletters are held to such a high standard — it makes our writers focused on what matters most.

When it comes to news curation, here’s what we think matters:

1) Content selected by real-world relevance, not catchy titles or more-searched terms.

2) Content selected and presented in a fair way without obvious bias or added commentary.

3) Transparency. No hidden agendas. Literally email us and ask us why we ran a story and we’ll tell you.

We’re going all in with email newsletters because I think we can save journalism by putting 99 cents of every dollar we spend on writers. Our business has close to zero infrastructure costs and massive consumer feedback.

Nine months ago, we started with the Inside Daily Brief, a twice-daily roundup of the most interesting news in the world, which had 10,000 subscribers and just one writer/editor. Now, we have an audience of 100,000 subscribers across eight newsletters, with six people on our editorial team (and it’s growing!).

We’re just getting started.

In addition to letting you subscribe to our existing newsletters, the new site also lets you vote for which newsletters we’ll launch next. Do you want us to hire a top notch writer and launch Inside Golf or Inside Space or Inside Video Games?

Cast your vote, and tell your friends – when we hit 5,000 “early adopters” we’ll launch it.

So, here’s my ask:

  • Head over to inside.com and subscribe/vote for all the newsletters you find most interesting
  • Check out our post today on Product Hunt and leave some feedback
  • Tell your friends! If we can keep growing the readership of these newsletters, we can keep improving and launching new ones. That starts with you spreading the word.
  • Hit reply to the emails we send and tell us what you love, if we make a mistake and share an intelligent response to the question of the day. I read every email reply!

– @jason

 

PS – Here’s our subscriber growth in the past few months:

screen-shot-2016-09-18-at-10-53-19-pm

If you have a newsletter and you want to join our network, please email partners@inside.com. We’re looking to not only launch our own newsletters, but host and sell the advertising in other ones too.


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