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  mercredi 17 octobre 20:18
100 articles

17 octobre

BBC News | Entertainment | UK Edition

BBC News | UK | UK Edition

Guardian Unlimited Science

  • 17:59
    David Nowell, a fellow of the Geological Society, is captivated by Earthrise over the moon, taken in 1968 Rather than being taken from “inner space”, the most iconic photograph of Earth (Martyrdom? I’ve seen that movie, thanks, 13 October) was taken in December 1968 by Apollo 8 astronaut Frank Borman, showing Earthrise, as the disc of our planet could be seen rising above the lunar surface. Even though this showed it as a fragile pale blue sphere in the indeterminable void of space, Catherine Shoard is right to say that we have trashed the planet anyway. This is a great pity, as we learned a (...) -- The moon, Photography, Space, Nasa, Science, People in science, US news, World news

BBC News | UK | UK Edition

Guardian Unlimited Science

  • 16:34
    Treatment for rare genetic disease to receive one of seven $3m Breakthrough awards at glitzy ceremony New techniques for peering into the intricate innards of cells and a discovery that has given hope for infants with a deadly genetic condition are among the developments that are being lauded in this year’s “Oscars for science”. The 2019 Breakthrough prize will see seven winning discoveries each celebrated with a $3m award for those behind the research to share, with a further six “New Horizons” prizes of $100,000 also going to young researchers in maths and physics and a $400,000-worth award (...) -- Science prizes, Science
  • 13:14
    From Douglas Adams to Oliver Sacks, the standup comedian reveals some of the writers that have helped him try to work out what makes us tick Most of my standup shows, whether about the behaviour of the bonobo ape or my addiction to celebrity narrowboat TV shows, are really me trying to work out what it is to be human and trying to see how wrong I am getting it. In middle age, I’ve been trying to evaluate the knowledge accumulated from shouting at strangers for money over the last three decades. Where does anxiety come from? What is the key to creativity? How can we deal with grief? How do (...) -- Books, Oliver Sacks, Culture, Health, mind and body books, Physics, Richard Feynman, Comics and graphic novels, Alison Bechdel, Kurt Vonnegut, Douglas Adams

Guardian Unlimited Books

  • 17:44
    Anna Burns's Booker prize win and poet Kate Tempest – books podcast - Presented by Richard Lea, with Claire Armitstead and Charlotte Higgins, and produced by Susannah Tresilian Guardian Unlimited Books
    Milkman delivers the 2018 Man Booker prize, while we listen in as a poet discusses the lyric art with her editor This week saw Anna Burns crowned as winner of the 2018 Man Booker prize. We discuss how Milkman speaks to us in the era of Brexit and #MeToo, despite its setting in 1970s Northern Ireland, and how a literary award can transform an author’s life. Then we hear from the poet Kate Tempest, who sits down to talk process with her editor and fellow poet Don Paterson. Can an old relationship ever find closure, and what happens when you’re so deep in poetry you can’t see past the way a (...) -- Books, Culture, Fiction, Man Booker prize, Awards and prizes, Poetry, Don Paterson, Kate Tempest

BBC News | UK | UK Edition

Guardian Unlimited Film News

  • 17:35
    EastEnders actor – and descendant of William the Conqueror – to explore 800 years of history He recently hit the headlines with an expletive-laden attack on David Cameron and his daughter’s appearance on Love Island but Danny Dyer is crowning a high-profile year with a role fronting a history series for BBC1. The EastEnders actor is presenting Danny Dyer’s Right Royal Family as the corporation tries to “inject fun” into some of its factual programming and create so-called event TV to combat streaming rivals such as Netflix. Continue (...) -- Danny Dyer, BBC, BBC One, Media, UK news

BBC News | England | UK Edition

BBC News | Wales | UK Edition

Guardian Unlimited Books

  • 16:00
    Icelandic has retained its literary vigour since the Sagas, but TV and tourism are a growing threat “Coffee and kleina,” reads a large sign at a roadside coffee shop by one of the main roads in Reykjavik. Not so many years ago, such a billboard would simply have read: “Kaffi og kleina” – in the language of the Vikings, the official language of Iceland. It is a privilege of the few to be able to read and write Icelandic, a language understood by only around 400,000 people worldwide. Icelandic, in which the historic Sagas were written in the 13th and 14th centuries, has changed so little since (...) -- Books, Culture, Iceland, Europe, Education, Fiction, Crime fiction
  • 14:36
    Novelist and judge Val McDermid reports that, contrary to award lore, the drama was restricted to the books at this year’s deliberations So that’s it for another year. Anna Burns has deservedly been crowned winner of the Man Booker prize 2018, and life returns to normal for everyone except her. No more gatherings of judges, no more anxiety for long- and shortlisted authors, no more sniping from the sidelines by critics, publishers and anybody who feels entitled to an opinion, whether informed by reading or not. We five judges met for the last time on Tuesday, to consider the remaining six (...) -- Man Booker prize 2018, Man Booker prize, Fiction, Awards and prizes, Books, Culture
  • 13:00
    From leeches and quackery to scandal and superstition … an absorbing investigation into blood Nine pints, give or take. That’s how much blood you have, surging in time to “the old brag”, as Sylvia Plath put it, of your heart. Although for Rose George in the opening scene of this book, it’s eight, since she introduces herself in the act of giving one pint to the NHS Blood and Transplant service. Ten minutes lying back hooked up to a bag, then eat a biscuit and go on your way. “The reality of it, that I am emitting a bodily fluid in public, is contained as much as possible,” she writes, “and not (...) -- Health, mind and body books, Books, Culture, Society books
  • 10:00
    He did it for the money and still loved mother Russia ... a fascinating book based on conversations with Sergei Skripal In June 2017, Mark Urban drove to Salisbury to meet a retired Russian spy. Urban – a BBC Newsnight journalist and author – was contemplating writing a book about east-west espionage after the end of the cold war. The spy was Sergei Skripal. He had kept a low profile in Britain since arriving in 2010 as part of an international spy swap. There were no signs he was engaged in active espionage. Arriving at his modest suburban home, Urban spotted a stack of jigsaw puzzles and (...) -- Books, Sergei Skripal, Politics books, History books, Espionage, Novichok poisonings, Russia, Culture

Guardian Unlimited Film News

  • 15:00
    This sharp, refreshing documentary charts the fortunes of high-school students in the unashamed pursuit of excellence This National Geographic documentary is a really watchable, distinctly enjoyable account of America’s annual International Science and Engineering Fair, a gigantic competition open to high-school science students from all over the globe. At the annual final in Los Angeles, 1,700 young people must present their projects in trade-fair-type booths and be prepared to answer questions from judges who tour around, taking notes. Translators are provided. This film nofollows a (...) -- Documentary films, Film, Culture, Science, Education
  • 14:20
    One of the leading British film critics of the postwar years who went on to write crime novels iThe writer Margaret Hinxman, who has died aged 94, was one of the influential band of female critics who did much to encourage film in postwar Britain. She enjoyed a long and productive career on numerous magazines, including the influential Picturegoer, two national newspapers, the Sunday Telegraph and Daily Mail, and as a writer of fiction. Following the doyennes of the profession Dilys Powell and CA Lejeune, who came from a slightly earlier generation, Hinxman’s contemporaries included the (...) -- Film criticism, Crime fiction, Film, Newspapers, Magazines, Fiction, Daily Mail
  • 13:00
    In his latest documentary, Moore’s bewildered fury at the president is powerfully evident, but he fails to deliver a knockout blow Michael Moore is still reeling at the news of Donald Trump’s presidential victory. Who can blame him? There is integrity, even heroism, in this outright refusal to come to terms with it, to normalise it in his mind. That custard pie in America’s face landed on 9 November 2016 – 11/9. The date gives Moore a cute numerical reversal of his great movie from 2004, Fahrenheit 9/11, and that’s still a documentary that must be respected for calling it right on the war on (...) -- Documentary films, Michael Moore, Film, Culture, US politics, Donald Trump
  • 11:30
    Following on from our examples of things people only do in the movies, we’ve put together a selection of your suggestions They don’t say goodbye at the end of phone calls in films or even wrap them up in any kind of way which I actually like. They just hang up after the main part of the conversation is done. I started doing this but people just called me back to ask if my signal had cut out. GhostWiper Continue reading... -- Film, Culture

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